Monthly Archives: September 2012

The Brett Tasting: comparing Brett types, pre/post fermentation additions

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Blind tastings are fun with friends

Here is another section of my journey into souring beers.  For this part, I really wanted to focus on Brettanomyces and the impact it can have on beer.  While Brett is not the main souring organism in sour beers, I have heard far too many different opinions, so I decided the only way to really grasp what this yeast does is to try it myself.  I decided to make 5 one gallon batches (X, Y, 1, 2, 3). Of these 5 batches; Y was the control with only Saccharomyces, X was Brett B added after Saccharomyces fermentation was complete, 1 was only Brett L, 2 was only Brett B, and 3 was both Saccharomyces and Brett B pitched together at the beginning of fermentation.  All Brett was from Wyeast.

tastings:

Y (control): a mild flavor with light chocolate, roast, and fruit flavor. some bread character with a slit astringency. big bodied

X and Y

 

X (Brett B added after Fermentation): a light cherry citrus nose with hints of strawberry, some cardboard in the taste but the flavor stands out more. chocolate in the front and a solid head. mild astringency

1 (Brett L only) Smells like sour strawberry and Worcester sauce.  The taste was reminiscent of ketchup and chocolate. no head retention

2 (Brett B only) An acetic hint in the nose with the same citrus cherry character.  Tasted very chocolate and was mild and balanced. best beer!

1 and 2, 3 was so gross that there is no pic, just bad memories

3 (Brett B and Sacc pitched together) smelled and tasted like vinegar. sharp acetic. ack. vinegar!

These beers were vastly different, more than I would have thought.  I can still run through this experiment two more times, can’t wait to see what changes.

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Citrus IPA: version $#!@

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My.p.a.

This is a style of beer that I have been working on for the majority of this year. I think I am finally honing in on a very smooth IPA that focuses on late hop additions to give wonderful aroma but doesn’t hit very hard with bitterness.  A very hoppy beer that you can also double as a guzzler.  I’ve really fallen in love with using Galaxy hops for bittering hops, then a melody of Citra, Cascade, and Galaxy in the last 15 minutes.  Dry hopped with 2 ounces of Citra to really bring out the citrus, grapefruit, and lemon character.  I used British Ale 1 from Wyeast, which is my preferred yeast for IPA’s, due to its ability to emphasize hop characteristics in a beer.

Citrus IPA Tasting:

Nose:  The scent comes up in the front with Citra characteristic, big lemon and citrus scents with some grapefruit underneath.

Appearance:  Very cloudy with an amber brown color.

Taste: The beer begins with a smooth round bitterness that blends into a lemon/grapefruit flavor.

mouthfeel: medium bodied, more bitter than not, but very easy to drink.

overall: This is the way it should taste.  Easy drinking citrus fruit that is mild enough to drink a few pints.    8.3/10

Visiting Belgium Pt 2: Het Anker, Westvleteren, De Halve Maan, Westmalle

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sweet

After three days in Brussels, My parents and I drove around the northwest countryside of Belgium making some brewery stops along the way.  First up was a brewery that was about 20 minutes north of Brussels called Het Anker.  This brewery was written into the trip because of its location and a good review from a travel book my mother bought (grrreat).  Het Anker is the brewery responsible for Gouden Carolus and Dentergems white beer.

Het Anker Lineup: from left to right
Gouden Carolus Classic, Tripel, Ambrio, Hopsinjoor, Anker Boscoli

I ended trying their whole lineup and I was pleasantly surprised by the sweet berry beer as well as the clean palate that all the beers shared.  Though this brewery wasn’t my favorite it was still a great way to start the day.

looking down from the mountain top

Next brewery on our tour was the elusive St. Sixtus Abbey of Westvleteren. Renown for having “The best beer in the world”, Westy is a brewery that in the middle of beautiful farmland.  We even turned into a farm trying to find this place.  Once you pass a school, the abbey is tucked away behind the tall walls that surround the monastery and the school.  Its weird, but the vibe reminded of a sort of California olive garden. For a Monday afternoon the place was packed with people, some of them being children since many of the beer gardens in Belgium seemed to be “family” friendly.

Westy Blond, Westy Cheese, Westy 12

Only 3 beers are made here, and all of them were delicious. The blond and the 8 were both well balanced beers, but the 12 really takes the cake.  I even got my mother drinking it by the time we left. Another very laid back Belgian afternoon surrounded with amazing beer and very friendly people, the name of the garden really rings true, “In de Verde” which translates to “in the peace”.

After Westy we headed to Brugge to enjoy some canals and De Halve Maan brewery. It is located very close to the center of this walkable city.  The beer was good, but compared to the other breweries on this trip, it really didn’t hold up.  All the beer was slightly unbalanced and just a bit to assertive for my liking.

Westmalle

Last up was the Trappist brewery Westmalle.  Once again, the brewery is closed to visitors, but across the street is a big beer garden (another olive garden vibe).  Westmalle fresh was much better than what we get here and the cheese was lovely.  I was also surprised to see how large Westmalle is.  The religious connection did not stop them making a pretty damn big brewery.

Triple and Dubel

All in all, I would live in Belgium in a heart beat.  Friendly people, welcoming cities, and some of the best beer in the world.  I would go back tomorrow if I could.  Now its time to start planning on visiting the rest of the country. GO TO BELGIUM!!