Tag Archives: homemade wine

New members to the family

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MORE CASKS!!!!

I must thank my friend’s Tom and Simon for these new friends.  Tom picked me up a virgin 2.5 cask with a really gnarly design on it

Dr. Deacon Brody

A mad scientist cask…. that’s gonna be something someday.  I’m planning on making some homemade wine to age this with. should be great!

I also picked up a 5 gallon bourbon cask from Kings Distillery with the help of my friend Simon. Its really surprising how much heavier a 5 gallon cask is when compared to a 2.5 gallon cask.

volume step up #1

This makes my total casks now 6, with two souring beers and four for straight (ish) beer.  The sour beers are in a rye cask and a bourbon cask.  The straight beers will go into a 5 gallon bourbon cask, 2.5 gallon scotch cask, and the hopeful red wine cask.

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The sour beer experiment cometh..

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Recently I have begun souring beer, which is a simple process of inoculating (infecting) beer with specific micro organisms that like living in beer.  So far, I have soured left over beer that was less than perfect, like my earl wit that had a bit too much gypsum and a poor fermentation. I decided to repurpose this beer into a Lambic.  I have also started souring my casks, starting with quad/ homemade wine into a rye cask with Roeselare Blend from Wyeast.

Now, repurposing beer is cool, and a great way to start souring beers, but I have way too many questions about the variables in souring to just use my leftovers for this.  It was time to brew a 10 gallon batch of Flanders Brown Ale. The brew day was easy for this beer, all until I transferred the cooled wort into all the different fermentors.

So, what am I going to do with all this beer to sour!? that’s right, use up every one gallon jug i can find.  To start off I took 5 gallons and put it into a normal 6 gallon better bottle carboy, which I pitched American Ale  yeast . This 5 gallon fermentor will be inoculated with Roeselare Blend after fermentation is complete.

VARIABLES!

The rest of the batch left plenty of room to play with, so I split up the beer into 1 gallon jugs and labeled them 1,2,3 and X, Y.  Y is the clean fermented beer that will act as the baseline for comparison (control).  1 was only Brett L, 2 was only Brett B, 3 was yeast and Brett B pitched simultaneously, and X will be Brett L added after regular yeast fermentation.  I also used a growler for my wild yeast, which will have US05 added after 3 weeks fermenting.

The beers with only Brett fermentation was very interesting to watch.  Brett L seems to be the same micro that infected my Earl Wit.  The Brett B fermentation looked crazy for about a week, then everything flocculated.

Brett L infection

Brett B infection

1L : brett L 2B: brett B

Now it’s a long wait to start bottling/ blending. which will take about a year!